COMBINE HISTORY WITH THE CHARMING COTSWOLDS OF ENGLAND… AND IT’S ONLY $30 /NIGHT AT THE ABBEY’S GUEST COTTAGE.

Written by eileen on April 26th, 2010

The Manor, known for being one of the oldest inhabited houses in Britain, is a conference and retreat center, managed by the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) that offers hospitality to individuals in a recently restored cottage on the grounds of the manor. see page 154 in LODGING IN BRITAIN'S MONASTERIES.


The Manor is a 13th century stone building and is known for being one of the oldest inhabited houses in Britain. The Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) offers hospitality to groups (guided and self-organized) in the main house and to individuals in a recently restored cottage on the grounds of the manor.

The Manor is in a small attractive village just southwest of Oxford in the center of the imaginary triangle formed by three historical towns: Abingdon, Wantage and Faringdon, all part of The Cotswolds. The village’s church features a turret containing two medieval chiming bells. Built on the foundations of a Saxon church, the present structure evolved over five centuries.

Nearby Vale of White Horse District derives from the figure of a horse carved into the hillside above the village of Uffington. This is the oldest chalk figure in Britain and dates to around 1000 BC. Inviting Abingdon was occupied in prehistoric times by settlers of the Bronze and Iron Ages. At one time Abingdon Abbey was the sixth richest in Britain. Two of the main roads into Abingdon cross the Thames and the Ock over bridges listed as ancient monuments. The bridge over the Thames dates back more than 550 years.

Typically Cotswold... the Cotswolds is famous for its bustling market towns and ancient mellow honey colored limestone villages.

The Cotswolds is famous for its bustling market towns and ancient mellow honey colored limestone villages. Many of the towns look today as they have for centuries when they prospered with the medieval wool trade before being forgotten for more than 300 years. This sequence of events contributed to the pristine landscape that now make the Cotswolds one of the most treasured regions in England.

Cirencester, capital of the Cotswolds, has the unmistakable air of a lively market town. The parish church of St. John Baptist dominates the town center in “woolgothic” style, a reference to the importance of income from the wool trade in medieval times. Often called the “Cathedral of the Cotswolds” it is a lasting symbol of the town’s wealth and influence in medieval England. The cathedral’s porch is an unusually grand landmark built in 1490.

William Morris called nearby Bibury “the most beautiful village in England.” Two communities (the other is Arlington) form the village. Overlooking a water meadow and river is Arlington Row, a group of ancient weavers’ cottages with steeply pitched roofs dating back to the 16th century.

There is a rich blend of properties in Bibury, some are timber-framed with thatched roofs but most are built of honey-colored Cotswold Stone. Presenting the quintessential Cotswold scene, they are defined by steep gables and tall chimneys, often with small stone clad windows and nearly all submerged in green foliage.

 

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