English Romantic Age

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Visit This Monastery in England’s Lake District and See What Inspired Wordsworth

Sunday, February 28th, 2010

The institution is in a pretty village in the breathtaking Lake District. It is encircled by the wooded fells of Loughrigg and Nab Scar with spectacular views of the mountains, Rothay Valley and Rydal Water. Rydal is a village forever associated with the poet William Wordsworth, one of the founders of the English Romantic Age. His home, Rydal Mount, provides a glimpse into his life.

The Mount has changed little since he lived there and still contains the original furnishings, personal possessions and first editions of his work. Walk through Grasmere, a tiny stone village beautifully situated between the tranquil waters of Grasmere Lake and the jagged heights of Helm Crag and Nab Scar, reveals a wondrous landscape of towering peaks, stunning lakes and glistening waterfalls. William Wordsworth lived in Dove Cottage just beyond the village church. The years of his supreme work as a poet were done during his residence in the cottage. In his epic poem, The Excursion, he described the village church of St. Oswald. Near the altar, an inscribed profile in white marble depicts Wordsworth between graceful daffodils and bluebells.

Nearby Ambleside, meaning “Shieling” or summer pasture by the riverbank, lies beside the northern shore of Lake Windemere, England’s largest lake. Ambleside is a small but bustling Victorian town and an ideal base from which to explore the Lake District. An open-air market is held every Wednesday. The Bridge House is purported to be the most photographed house in the entire Lake District. Originally used as an apple store, it was ingeniously built directly over Stock Beck on a stone arch in order to avoid paying any land tax.

For more information visit:monasteriesofbritain.com