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DISCOVER RUINS AND AN IRON AGE HILL FORT… $60 per person for a twin in this historic institution.

Tuesday, September 14th, 2010

Salisbury is home to a 17th century theological college offering hospitality to all.

Salisbury is home to a 17th century theological college offering hospitality to all. An historical town its earliest foundation dates to the 11th century. It is only two miles from a hill called Old Sarum, site of the original castle and cathedral, now impressive ruins. The massive Iron Age hill fort of Old Sarum was re-used by the Romans, Saxons and Normans before growing into one of the most flourishing settlements in medieval England.

From the Iron Age ramparts, there are fine views of the countryside. Medieval Salisbury has much to offer including historic chequers (squares) and alleyways, charming half-timbered buildings and Britain’s finest medieval cathedral, unique Salisbury Cathedral, Unlike its cousins, the cathedral did not evolve gradually over centuries but rather was built to completion within a single generation. As a result, it presents a remarkable unity of vision. Begun in 1220, the 404′ spire is the tallest in England, a fact known by most English school children. What is not as well known is that the medieval builders of the spire accomplished their masterpiece with foundations only five to six feet deep in the wet ground to bear the strain of 6,400 tons. There are 323 steps to the spire and excellent views of Salisbury and the countryside.

The Cathedral Library houses the original copy of the Magna Carta, brought here by William Longpre, Earl of Salisbury and half brother to King John.

The Cathedral Library houses the original copy of the Magna Carta, brought here by William Longpre, Earl of Salisbury and half brother to King John. Longpre is buried in the cathedral, the first person so honored. The nave houses the oldest working mechanical clock in the world dating to 1386. There are no hands and no clock face; rather, it rings a chime of bells every hour. It was originally built to call the bishops to services.

Just as there is more to the cathedral than the spire so there is more to the city than the cathedral. A wide green space, The Close envelops the cathedral. Essentially it is a walled city within the city ringed by wonderful period houses. Among the most memorable is Mompesson House, an elegant spacious 18th century structure, it displays magnificent plasterwork, a fine oak staircase and splendid furniture and contains the Turnbull collection of 18th century drinking glasses.

For more information got to: MonasteriesOfBritain.com