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Natural Surroundings and Edinburgh Highlight a Stay at this Abbey

Monday, March 15th, 2010

Surrounded by 1,300 acres of grounds formed by gardens, woodlands, moorland and lakes, at one time the abbey was a Scottish mansion. It occupies a tranquil site only thirty miles from Edinburgh. It was the first Cistercian monastery to be founded in Scotland after the Reformation. Nearby Edinburgh is one of Europe’s most alluring capitals. Perched on extinct volcanoes rising from the sheltered shore of the Firth of Forth, its natural setting is spread over a range of hills. At the heart of the city lies a mighty castle with over one thousand years of history and memorable sweeping views, akin to those of Paris as seen from the heights of the Eiffel Tower.

The city’s main street is famous for its “Royal Mile” a colorful venue that is home to a variety of boutiques, restaurants and inns. St. Giles Cathedral was built in Gothic style and its most notable external feature is the Crown Spire. It contains almost 200 memorials to distinguished Scots. The “booming” sound heard over the city each day comes from the “One O’clock Gun,” at Edinburgh Castle. The impressive structure, historic seat of Scottish Kings, has dominated Edinburgh for more than a thousand years and is the best-preserved and most historic castle in Scotland. The castle recalls the turbulence of Scottish history from the earliest times to the last Jacobite rebellion in 1745. It remains a strong reminder of Scottish national pride. Fine views can be enjoyed from almost every part of the castle, particularly from the ramparts where Edinburgh’s dramatic skyline, wedged between sea and hills, can be seen to best advantage.  An interesting day trip can be made to nearby Berwick-upon-Tweed. During the harsh border struggles, possession of the town alternated between Scottish and English. The town changed hands thirteen times before being declared English territory in 1482.

For more information visit www.monasteriesofbritain.com.

Scotland: Seclusion, religious sites and unparalled beauty are the hallmarks of this Abbey… full board is just $85.00

Thursday, March 4th, 2010

The House overlooks the clear waters of the sound of Iona.


Beautifully situated in a tranquil site in the shadow of the Abbey, the House overlooks the clear waters of the sound. In the very heart of the House is an exquisite chapel, a place that represents the Episcopal Church of the Isle. The tiny isle is considered one of the cradles of Western Christianity and has a long tradition of pilgrimage and mission dating to the year 563 AD when St. Columba and thirteen followers landed on the white beaches at the south end of the island. At that time they established a monastery and from that monastery the Christian faith spread throughout Scotland, Northern England and beyond. One of Scotland’s most historic and venerated sites, the grounds of the abbey and nunnery preserve a comprehensive collection of Christian carved stones.

The history of the House began in 563 AD.

Little is known of the nuns who lived there. Like the Benedictine monks, they followed a strict life of prayer and contemplation. A few clues have been left that shed some light on various aspects of their lives – the tomb of one of the prioresses is so detailed in its carving as to give a clear depiction of her dress. On the nearby Isle of Mull, the “Nun’s Cave” has crosses carved into its inner walls.

For more information visit monasteriesofbritain.com

Seclusion, Religious Sites Are Hallmarks of this Scottish Abbey

Wednesday, March 3rd, 2010

Isle of Mull, Scotland

Beautifully situated in a tranquil site in the shadow of the Abbey, the House overlooks the clear waters of the sound. In the very heart of the House is an exquisite chapel, a place that represents the Episcopal Church of the Isle. The tiny isle is considered one of the cradles of Western Christianity and has a long tradition of pilgrimage and mission dating to the year 563 AD when St. Columba and thirteen followers landed on the white beaches at the south end of the island. At that time they established a monastery and from that monastery the Christian faith spread throughout Scotland, Northern England and beyond. One of Scotland’s most historic and venerated sites, the grounds of the abbey and nunnery preserve a comprehensive collection of Christian carved stones.

Little is known of the nuns who lived there. Like the Benedictine monks, they followed a strict life of prayer and contemplation. A few clues have been left that shed some light on various aspects of their lives – the tomb of one of the prioresses is so detailed in its carving as to give a clear depiction of her dress. On the nearby Isle of Mull, the “Nun’s Cave” has crosses carved into its inner walls.

For more information visit: monasteriesoffbritain.com